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Workshops for advanced users part 5: Ambisonics with Joseph Anderson

1st – 5th October at 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Joseph Anderson: Ambisonics & the Ambisonic Toolkit, theory and artistic practice.
Location: Notam studios in Oslo
Price: 5000,- NOK for all academic employees in 50% positions or more, free for others. The course is produced in collaboration with BEK – Bergen center for electronic art.

In this workshop we will immerse ourselves in a central technique of immersive sound; Ambisonics. We will go into the theoretical foundation behind Ambisonics, learn to master the tools practically as well as look into how to work with space artistically. We will also get a visit by Trond Lossius who has worked with Joseph Anderson to create the Ambisonics toolkit for Reaper.

Joseph Anderson is one of the foremost international experts on the artistic use of immersive sound, and is affiliated with the Center for Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS) at the University of Washington. Joseph Anderson is a composer and programmer and has worked extensively with the use of space in music and sound. Anderson’s work is focused on electronic music produced with self-authored tools and signal processing algorithms. He is the lead author of the Ambisonic Toolkit software, a software application that makes advanced techniques for spatial audio easily accessible. Joseph Anderson works both as a composer and researcher and has also worked as a developer in Silicon Valley.

Trond Lossius works with sound and installations. He uses multi-channel immersive sound as an immaterial and temporary sculptural medium in works that investigates the relationships between sound, place and space. Lossius is affiliated with the Oslo National Academy of the Arts (KHiO), where he is head of the Artistic Research and Fellowship Programme.

More information on the Ambisonics Toolkit og Center for Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS):
http://www.ambisonictoolkit.net/
https://dxarts.washington.edu/

1st – 5th October at 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Price: 5000,- NOK for all academic employees in 50% positions or more, free for others.
Teachers: Joseph Anderson and Trond Lossius
Language: English
Number of seats: 12
Location: Notam studios in Oslo
Registration: NOW

For registration, send an email to admin@notam02.no with name, residence and email address as well as information about your background knowledge and motivation to take the course. We will then send you detailed information about payment, start-up and further follow-up.

Curriculum for the week:
Monday 1 October, 2018: Introduction
-Soundfield kernel composition: an idiomatic musical composition strategy
-Ambisonics Theory & Background
-Terms & Concepts
-Flavors of Ambisonics
-Soundfield as framework
-Channels, coefficients, modes
-Spherical & angular domain, “sampling”, de/reconstruction
-Soundfield prototypes
-Nearfield Effect
-Exercise: Synthesize Risset’s bell with NFE (& AEP), “from scratch”
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Tuesday 2 October, 2018: Getting started
-Heyser’s Analysis
-Soundfield prototypes
-Soundfield indicators
-Acquisition
-Spherical & angular domain
-Field recording (FOA) – (Soundfield microphone)
-Studio recording (FOA) – (Microphone arrays)
-Synthesis via convolution (FOA)
-Exercise(s): acquisition
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Wednesday 3 October, 2018: Imaging and Processing I
-Single Beams & Nulls
-Beamforming, decoding & re-encoding
-Patterns & analysis
-NFE radial filtering, looking ‘into’ a soundfield
-Soundfield tinting & signal processing
-Beaming in conjunction with Heyser’s Analysis
-Exercise(s): implement algorithms & process soundfields
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Thursday 4 October, 2018: Imaging and Processing II
-Soundfield decomposition & re-composition
-Soundfield signal processing
-& NFE
-Soundfield synthesis strategies
-& NFE
-Exercise(s): implement algorithms & process soundfields
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Friday 5 October, 2018: In practice
-Review: Soundfield kernel composition strategy
-Soundfield decoding, “in practice”
-Theory
-Design & analysis criteria
-Exercise(s): individual & group projects
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Organised Sound 23.3

In the latest issue of the journal Organised Sound, 23.3, Jøran Rudi has published some of his research on  Knut Wiggen, the most important computer music pioneer in Scandinavia.  He worked as director of both the concert organization Fylkingen and the Electronic Music Studio (EMS) from mid-sixties to mid-seventies, and delivered important contributions through his construction of the first functioning hybrid computer music studio in the world, through a 9 m. long interactive controller , and through the programming language MusicBox, where he could realize a new *composition method* based on the affordances of the technological development.

ICMC 2018

International Computer Music Conference 2018 is over, and from Norway, NOTAM’s Jøran Rudi gave a presentation of his recent research: The Contributions of Computer Music Pioneer Knut Wiggen.

Other contributions from Norway was Ulf Holbrook’s piece Ice Feathers, and Eirik Bleikesaune’s installation Sound walks in Silence.

Knut Olaf Sunde – Himdalen and Mirnyi

As  composer, Knut Olaf Sunde often works with site-specific music; music that yields the most meaning when listened to in the spaces it is designed for. In this sense, the music is related to site-specific visual art and the broader category concept art.  Sunde has been working in this fashion for years, and we remember the work Molladalen from a few years back, and  the resent Comfort Music. All realized in collaboration with NOTAM staff.

The works Himdalen and Mirnyi will be shown as installations in November, and here are short introductions:

 

Himdalen

November 24. to 25., 2018

Himdalen in Akershus

Time: TBA

Tickets: 400/300

The entire evening and night outdoors in a concert installation at several locations in the terrain.

Himdalen is a valley east of  Øyeren in Akershus, and is the location of the largest storage facility of nuclear waste in Norway –  KLDRA Himdalen.

The place and the function of waste storage with a long halving-time augments the crucial significance of communication – the longer time a situation lasts, the more difficult it is to understand the context as it hvelves over time. Meaning does not emerge in information alone, but is interpreted in contexts crucial for how we experience situations, cultures civilizations, out environment and in general the world around us.

Music is a code that hinges on decoding in context to give meaning. The sense of place, the physical presence and maneuvering in the landscape around the storage facility is essential in grasping the entire image that the puzzle consists of.  The audience must explore the area – and tent and appropriate clothing for the season is important.

Participants: Aksiom ensemble and NOTAM.

More detail info on where to meet up, and the necessary equipment will be announced at a date closer to the event.<hr>

Mirnyj

November 27.,2018

Jakob Church, Oslo

Time: TBA

Tickets: 250/200

Four hour long multichannel immersive audiovisual work with horizontal projection above a horizontal audience.

Mirnyj is located in Siberia in Russia, and is entirely dependent on the diamonds in the ground. Within city bounds, there is an enormous open mine – the second greatest man-made hole in the ground in the world. 

In order to understand something, we need to change our perspective.  We need to step into the unfamiliar. This work attempts to create a feeling of being there, and to create the atmosphere of this unfamiliar place. It forms an essayistic narrative where Russia serves as a metaphor for thought patterns, and the open mine as a negative print of the development of both USSR and Russia.

The immersive sound plays together with visual imagery, where prolonged situations and moments creates a monotony with abundant space with slow processes.

The soundscape and vide are based on recordings made in Russia, plus satellite images and monochrome flicker.  Blinking  lights will be used during the performance, and might cause discomfort for some.

Workshops for advanced users part 5: Ambisonics with Joseph Anderson

1st – 5th October at 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Joseph Anderson: Ambisonics & the Ambisonic Toolkit, theory and artistic practice.
Location: Notam studios in Oslo
Price: 5000,- NOK for all academic employees in 50% positions or more, free for others.

In this workshop we will immerse ourselves in a central technique of immersive sound; Ambisonics. We will go into the theoretical foundation behind Ambisonics, learn to master the tools practically as well as look into how to work with space artistically. We will also get a visit by Trond Lossius who has worked with Joseph Anderson to create the Ambisonics toolkit for Reaper.

Joseph Anderson is one of the foremost international experts on the artistic use of immersive sound, and is affiliated with the Center for Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS) at the University of Washington. Joseph Anderson is a composer and programmer and has worked extensively with the use of space in music and sound. Anderson’s work is focused on electronic music produced with self-authored tools and signal processing algorithms. He is the lead author of the Ambisonic Toolkit software, a software application that makes advanced techniques for spatial audio easily accessible. Joseph Anderson works both as a composer and researcher and has also worked as a developer in Silicon Valley.

Trond Lossius works with sound and installations. He uses multi-channel immersive sound as an immaterial and temporary sculptural medium in works that investigates the relationships between sound, place and space. Lossius is affiliated with the Oslo National Academy of the Arts (KHiO), where he is head of the Artistic Research and Fellowship Programme.

More information on the Ambisonics Toolkit og Center for Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS):
http://www.ambisonictoolkit.net/
https://dxarts.washington.edu/

1st – 5th October at 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Price: 5000,- NOK for all academic employees in 50% positions or more, free for others.
Teachers: Joseph Anderson and Trond Lossius
Language: English
Number of seats: 12
Location: Notam studios in Oslo
Registration: NOW

For registration, send an email to admin@notam02.no with name, residence and email address as well as information about your background knowledge and motivation to take the course. We will then send you detailed information about payment, start-up and further follow-up.

Curriculum for the week:
Monday 1 October, 2018: Introduction
-Soundfield kernel composition: an idiomatic musical composition strategy
-Ambisonics Theory & Background
-Terms & Concepts
-Flavors of Ambisonics
-Soundfield as framework
-Channels, coefficients, modes
-Spherical & angular domain, “sampling”, de/reconstruction
-Soundfield prototypes
-Nearfield Effect
-Exercise: Synthesize Risset’s bell with NFE (& AEP), “from scratch”
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Tuesday 2 October, 2018: Getting started
-Heyser’s Analysis
-Soundfield prototypes
-Soundfield indicators
-Acquisition
-Spherical & angular domain
-Field recording (FOA) – (Soundfield microphone)
-Studio recording (FOA) – (Microphone arrays)
-Synthesis via convolution (FOA)
-Exercise(s): acquisition
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Wednesday 3 October, 2018: Imaging and Processing I
-Single Beams & Nulls
-Beamforming, decoding & re-encoding
-Patterns & analysis
-NFE radial filtering, looking ‘into’ a soundfield
-Soundfield tinting & signal processing
-Beaming in conjunction with Heyser’s Analysis
-Exercise(s): implement algorithms & process soundfields
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Thursday 4 October, 2018: Imaging and Processing II
-Soundfield decomposition & re-composition
-Soundfield signal processing
-& NFE
-Soundfield synthesis strategies
-& NFE
-Exercise(s): implement algorithms & process soundfields
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Friday 5 October, 2018: In practice
-Review: Soundfield kernel composition strategy
-Soundfield decoding, “in practice”
-Theory
-Design & analysis criteria
-Exercise(s): individual & group projects
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Kurs for viderekomne del 5: Ambisonics med Joseph Anderson

Kurs for viderekomne del 5: Ambisonics med Joseph Anderson

1. – 5. oktober kl 10:00 – 16:00
Joseph Anderson: Ambisonics toolkit, teori og kunstnerisk praksis.
Sted: Notams studioer i Oslo
Pris: 5000, – NOK for alle akademiske ansatte i 50% stillinger eller mer, gratis for andre.

I dette verkstedet vil vi fordype oss i en sentral teknikk i forbindelse med omsluttende lyd; Ambisonics. Vi vil gå inn på det teoretiske grunnlaget bak Ambisonics, lære praktisk beherskelse av verktøyet samt se på hvordan man kan arbeide med rom i egen kunstnerisk praksis. Vi får også besøk av Trond Lossius som har arbeidet sammen med Joseph Anderson for å lage programmet Ambisonics toolkit for Reaper.

Joseph Anderson er en av vår tids fremste eksperter på kunstnerisk bruk av omsluttende lyd, og er tilknyttet Center for Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS) ved University of Washington. Joseph Anderson er komponist og programmerer og har arbeidet mye med bruk av rom i musikk og lyd. Andersons arbeid er fokusert på elektronisk musikk produsert med selvskrevne verktøy og signalbehandlingsalgoritmer. Han står bak programmet Ambisonic Toolkit, et program som gjør avanserte teknikker for lyd i rom enkelt tilgjengelige. Joseph Anderson arbeider både som komponist og forsker, og har dessuten jobbet som utvikler i Silicon Valley.

Trond Lossius arbeider med lyd og installasjoner. Han benytter flerkanal omsluttende lyd som et immaterielt og temporært skulpturelt medium i arbeider som undersøker forhold mellom lyd, sted og rom.  Lossius er tilknyttet Kunsthøgskolen i Oslo (KHiO) hvor han er leder for kunstnerisk utviklingsarbeid, forskning og stipendiatprogram.

Mer informasjon om Ambisonics Toolkit og Center for Digital Arts and Experimental Media (DXARTS):
http://www.ambisonictoolkit.net/
https://dxarts.washington.edu/

1. – 5. oktober kl 10:00 – 16:00
Pris: 5000, – NOK for alle akademiske ansatte i 50% stillinger eller mer, gratis for andre.
Lærere: Joseph Anderson og Trond Lossius
Språk: Engelsk
Antall plasser: 12
Sted: Notams studioer i Oslo
Påmelding: NÅ

For påmelding, send en mail til admin@notam02.no med navn, bosteds- og og mailadresse samt informasjon om dine bakgrunnskunnskaper og motivasjon for å ta kurset. Videre sender vi deg detaljert informasjon om betaling, oppstart og videre oppfølging.

Program for uken (kun på engelsk):
Monday 1 October, 2018: Introduction
-Soundfield kernel composition: an idiomatic musical composition strategy
-Ambisonics Theory & Background
-Terms & Concepts
-Flavors of Ambisonics
-Soundfield as framework
-Channels, coefficients, modes
-Spherical & angular domain, “sampling”, de/reconstruction
-Soundfield prototypes
-Nearfield Effect
-Exercise: Synthesize Risset’s bell with NFE (& AEP), “from scratch”
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Tuesday 2 October, 2018: Getting started
-Heyser’s Analysis
-Soundfield prototypes
-Soundfield indicators
-Acquisition
-Spherical & angular domain
-Field recording (FOA) – (Soundfield microphone)
-Studio recording (FOA) – (Microphone arrays)
-Synthesis via convolution (FOA)
-Exercise(s): acquisition
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Wednesday 3 October, 2018: Imaging and Processing I
-Single Beams & Nulls
-Beamforming, decoding & re-encoding
-Patterns & analysis
-NFE radial filtering, looking ‘into’ a soundfield
-Soundfield tinting & signal processing
-Beaming in conjunction with Heyser’s Analysis
-Exercise(s): implement algorithms & process soundfields
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Thursday 4 October, 2018: Imaging and Processing II
-Soundfield decomposition & re-composition
-Soundfield signal processing
-& NFE
-Soundfield synthesis strategies
-& NFE
-Exercise(s): implement algorithms & process soundfields
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Friday 5 October, 2018: In practice
-Review: Soundfield kernel composition strategy
-Soundfield decoding, “in practice”
-Theory
-Design & analysis criteria
-Exercise(s): individual & group projects
-Group audition/presentation & discussion

Bálint Laczkó

Bálint Laczkó is a Hungarian composer, audio-related software developer, hobby-programmer, and generally a technology enthusiast. He further describes himself as “ a bookworm, a nature- and cycling-lover, and a learning-junkie as well”.

Bálint has a long experience of music. “I studied music since the age of 7, and after high school I specialised myself in music composition. Sounds and our relationship with them are what has fascinated  me most in all my life. So studying music seemed to be a reasonable choice.

Bálint’s residence which started in september last year, is funded by an Erasmus scholarship.. But why did the young Hungarian composer choose Norway?

“I chose Norway because of Notam, and I chose Notam because it is an exceptional crossroad of technology and organized sound. Here I am surrounded not only by musicians, composers, but people who build custom hardware and software, produce music in studios as well as in concert halls; so generally people from whom I can learn a great deal and who can really broaden my horizon. I didn’t necessarily plan that but I have also learned a great deal from all the people I’ve met, and all the kindness, generosity and enthusiasm which surrounds me here.”

If you drop by Notam, you probably find Bálint working with a project or two. His enthusiasm is quite infectious. “Ultimately, the discovery of sounds or sound-relationships is what has always been my drive, no matter I am listening to music, working on or learning about software and programming, or – especially – composing.

“Generally, I start from something like an aural vision, which is usually how the piece would start as well. It illustrates a characteristic dynamism, source sound(s), process, texture, movement and spatiality, most often a mixture of all these. Depending on this vision, finding the right musical starting point can be a very straightforward and very tedious process as well. But what may be a general approach is that I always look for short, and fairly simple musical ideas to start with, and the act of composition mostly emerges from the expeditionary work of deconstructing or rearranging that idea, and adding more and more levels of abstraction. Another general approach is that I always feel that music is the network of contextuality of a lot of different sound-“beings” sharing some sort of mutual space. This may have something to do with my enthusiasm about nature, and it is definitely closely related to the idea of collage (from a purely structural perspective).”

Bálint will finish his internship at Notam in the middle of June. “It has been great, intense, full of new experiences. Beyond the enormous amount of technical things I’ve learned, I will definitely take a load of dear memories with me, about the lot’s of fun we had together (during and beyond office-time), the sacred 12 o’clock lunches, the high level of shared friendly nerdiness, Uruk (the famous Notam dog) resting his head on my elbow while I am working at my desk, the shared late-night work craziness, the spontaneous bar-times, and that there is always someone interesting to listen to over a cup of coffee or tea… Or just walking through the corridor seeing everyone doing something interesting. I will really miss everybody here!”

On the 15th of June, Bálint will give a presentation on his work. The will be some fingerfood and everyone is welcome.

Hav-Havn-Savn-Gavn

Developer at Notam, Hans Wilmers, supervised Pernille Meidel under the project Hav-Havn-Savn-Gavn to build a speaker on the sailing boat Slursula. The design of the fog horn was made based on acoustic principles.

Pernille describes the project as follows:

“The noise of fog horn can be heard on the coast when the fog prevents the vessels from seeing. The sound is violent and can carry many kilometers to prevent ships from grounding. The signal consists of low-frequency sounds that travel long distances.

The sound signal is picked up by the landscape and creates echo variations. The sound will then be able to convey the environment despite poor vision, depending on the echo of the sound in the landscape. The signal is associated with mystery, it warns of an unpredictable situation and signals both danger while conveying hope.

It was  the Canadians Robert Follis who invented the fog signal. When he got home one evening while there was fog, he heard through an open window his daughter practicing the piano. He recorded that the dark tones could be heard better than the high ones.

After the lighthouses have been automated, most fog horns, at least in Norway, have been removed and they have been replaced by electric alternatives. “

Why Pernille further why she chose the Fog horn:

“I am primarily concerned with the huge dread such a horn can make and the mystery I feel it represents. The subject of the project revolves around how the fog horn signal can both give us a sense of security and insecurity at the same time. The doubleness that the fog horn signals danger while simultaneously signaling that one should avoid danger makes the sound both beautiful and creepy at once.

I think it’s an important aspect that after the lighthouses have been automated, most fog horns have been removed and replaced by electronic alternatives. “

Pierre-Luc Senécal

One of Notam’s guests this spring was Pierre-Luc Senécal from Canada. Senécal has worked on 4 different projects : 3 projects for dance and 1 personal project of electroacoustic music.

“I’m especially sensitive to sound quality and techniques such as mixing and mastering. Therefore, I always look for studios that offer great listening environment, so I chose to work in studio 1. My teacher Robert Normandeau praised the quality of Notam, especially the multichannel studio 3, saying it was one of the most beautiful studio he ever worked in. Also, I am passionate about travels and culture, and saw this stay in Notam as an opportunity to discover Oslo and Norwegian culture.

I really enjoyed exchanging with Cato Langnes, the in-house sound engineer of Notam. He gave me practical tips that I’ve already integrated in my working process. The amazing freedom of use of the studio was instrumental in the important productivity I was capable of achieving. Also, hearing Norwegian musicians during the Only Connect festival was extremely inspiring. I haven’t heard this level of musicianship often.”

The canadian explains his projects further:

“Espaces is a soundtrack for a contemporary jig creation which also blends elements of theatre and science-fiction story-telling. 95% of the sound material I used comes from Ondes Martenot recordings that I’ve processed in order to obtain an abstract aura of spaceships and interstellar travels. At some point in the creation, the soundscape will be ruptured with rhythmical, quasi techno music. I thought of opposing the very refine electronic material of the Ondes Martenot with raw noise, such as the one I obtained during a few sessions of “no input” music I realized at Notam. The only sound source I’ve used was feedback that I created within a mixing board made accessible by the studio. Instead of using a mouse and a computer, I created material by performing microscopic changes of the knobs and faders, which produced unsuspected sound. There is something inspiring about the playfulness, nearly childlike pleasure I get from obtaining sounds that are considered aggressive, culturally speaking.

Spectre is a soundtrack for an art video centered on the choreography of 4 female dancers. I evoked the thematics of fear, power and struggle through an arsenal of heavily processed sounds such as electrical arc, waterphone, glitch, synthesizers, voice recordings and other metal objects reminiscent of the industrial environment where the images were shot. The long and strenuous hours I spent mixing and the systemic comparison of my material to super-produced pop music gave the soundtrack a sort of hollywood-esque quality of production. In addition to my conversations with in-house sound engineer Cato Langnes, this process is very representative of the technics I used to compose a music both fierce and dynamic, between sheer agression and exciting tension.

Exude.light is a miniature for Ondes Martenot and electronics. At first, I wanted to exploit the instrument’s inherent lyricism, and avoid at all cost its more stereotyped electronic sounds. In the end, I fully embraced those timbers of postindustrial science fiction movie. Moreover, the final melody clearly recalls the music of Vangelis, making the piece a sort of neo noir or cyber punk fantasy, a kind of Blade Runner 1949. Since I’m not an instrumental composer by any means, I recorded the playing of Estelle Lemire, processed and assembled the material from which I extracted a melodic line that she played in the concert. I first used this back-and-forth fashion between electronic and instrumental during Prim’R, the 4th piece that I remixed during my stay at Notam. Here I was asked to compose a piece for a dance duet representing two children playing ball in a park. In collaboration with a tuba player, I decided to “play a music game”, where the tuba’s extended technique could mimick the rebound of a ball but also to invite the tuba player in my “sandbox of electronic music”. After a session of recording with him, the sounds where, yet again, processed and mixed into an electronic track that inspired a score which was played live during the dance choreography, blurring the line between fabulated and realistic tuba. My stay at Notam allowed me to extend this idea of game and frontiers between electronic and classic music, between reality and illusion. With a variety of artificial reverbs, I explored notions of space and acoustics in which the sounds can exist and seem realistic or outworldly.

I thank the SOCAN Foundation for their funding, which facilitated my stay at Notam studios.

Blikk

By Jøran Rudi

Blikk is an installation by Sigurd Berge (music), Irma Salo Jæger (sculpture) and Jan Erik Vold (text). The installation was commissioned by Henie Onstad Art Center (HOK) and was completed in 1970. The National Museum wishes to reconstruct the work and have it installed when the new museum building opens at Vestbanen.

The work consists of five steel constructions that are placed in a pentagram, each containing a paddle wheel which is rotated by a small fan placed on the floor. The leaves are made from colored plexiglass in different patterns, and when the paddles rotate, light, colors and shadows are projected onto the walls of the room. The music originally came from 20 speakers that were hung on the walls of HOK’s concert hall, above the audience.

Blikk is constructed with strict visual lines, where the light is accurately driven by a system that only occasionally syncronizes to the music. The installation lasts 83 minutes, with two 40-minute parts only interrupted by a 3-minute “laser show.” The laser show is executed by way of a small mirror which is mounted on a speaker membrane, and that reflects the laser beam in a complicated patternwhen the membrane vibrates.

The music consists of poems written by Jan Erik Vold, including Svingdør, Stemmen and Kulturuke, and the texts alternate with Berge’s electronic compositions of which several were made at the Gaudeamus foundation in the Netherlands. Many of these works have not yet been published.

NOTAM’s tasks in the project are divided into research and practical realization – research in the reconstruction of the work’s audio part, weighing contradictory information and source material in the tradition of media archeology, and practical realization through digitization and noise removal from the audio files, as well as the construction and programming of a state of the art control system that will sustain this work for several years.  Jøran Rudi, Cato Langnes and Thom Johansen are NOTAM’s representatives in this project.